| World Challenge
  • Ebola Outbreak in the Congo

    Rachel Chimits
    May 23, 2019

    Government organizations and churches are working side-by-side to help save people from one of the world’s deadliest diseases.

    The current Ebola outbreak in the Congo is quickly becoming one of the deadliest in history, second only to the 2014 to 2016 epidemic that raged across West African, killing more than 11,300 people.

    On April 30th of last year, several cases of Ebola were confirmed in the city of Mabalako. By October, the disease was swiftly beginning to spread to other major north-eastern cities. Doctors and other health professionals worked furiously to contain this budding epidemic, and for a while, it looked like they may have succeeded.

    However, a surge of new cases turned up this March, hitting all of the previous hotbed areas once more.

  • Protecting Mothers and the Unborn

    Rachel Chimits
    May 22, 2019

    In the Philippines, church workers are helping educate pregnant women about how to keep themselves and their babies healthy.

    Pregnancy usually means extra doctor visits to make sure the mother and baby stay healthy.

    Some women, however, don’t have this option because either they live in a remote village or it’s not traditional practice. They often don’t realize the many health benefits that preventative care can offer both them and their child.

    In the Philippines, World Challenge partners have begun offering “mothers’ classes” for pregnant women in rural or poorer areas. 

  • The Problem of Happiness

    Rachel Chimits
    May 21, 2019

    “You make known to me the path of life; in your presence is fullness of joy, and at your right hand are pleasures forevermore” (Psalm 16:11 ESV).

    In her 2011 book, Ellen DeGeneres said, "…the key to happiness is being happy by yourself and for yourself. Happiness comes from within. You have the power to change your own mindset so that all the negative, horrible thoughts that try to invade your psyche are replaced with happy, positive, wonderful thoughts."

    This advice sounds very catchy and pleasant. In some limited ways, it’s correct; we do have control over our reactions to bad circumstances. We come up against the limits of positive thinking rather quickly, however.

  • Returning Home

    Anna Kozlyuk
    May 20, 2019

    Many young, educated Albanians leave their homeland in search of a better life, and Vera intended to be no different until she met God.

    Mynevere Saliu, more often called Vera by friends and family, was born into a Muslim Roma family in the city Peqin. 

    Even though she had been raised to respect Islamic traditions, Vera didn’t really believe in Allah. When she was able to finally leave for university, she couldn’t wait. She met up with a close friend there, but suddenly her friend started talking about Jesus. All this “religious talk” chafed Vera.

    “I even told her, ‘You’re stupid to believe in a God you have never seen.’” Vera remembered. “But she wouldn’t stop talking about Jesus until one day when I finally told her, ‘If you like my company, stop talking to me about this Christ.'”

  • When Depression Isn't Healed

    Rachel Chimits
    May 17, 2019

    A battle with mental health can already feel like a lonely one, but when God doesn’t miraculously free us from it, the question “Why?” inevitable rises.

    A research project collaborating with the University of Oxford conducted a study on depression and anxiety disorders worldwide in 2016. They found that about 322 million people globally suffer from depression, making it the predominant psychological disorder.

    Despite its prevalence, depression is often ignored or dismissed in great part because of the wide variety of ways it can manifest.

  • Drug Runner Comes to Christ

    Rachel Chimits
    May 16, 2019

    A drug user and alcoholic turns to God and becomes a respected member of his church and community.

    A Hard Crash

    Francis was a renowned weed smoker, drug supplier and drunkard in his Ugandan village.

    …“members of the community didn’t like me because of my habitual drinking and smoking,” said Francis. “I was always involved in bar fights and gambling, and I sold marijuana in the village. Parents didn’t want me near their children for fear I would recruit them into this devilish behavior.”

    He confessed that alcohol and marijuana also drove him to harass his wife on a daily basis. Painfully, he recalled one fateful evening when he stumbled home after getting extremely drunk and began beating his wife.

  • A Vision for Kenya

    Irene Life
    May 15, 2019

    The callings of God on our lives can seem impossible, but one girl’s story is a testament to God laying out his path before us.

    Back in 2017, I was napping and had a vision. It was so vivid, I don’t know what else to call it. I saw myself in front of a board meeting, and I was talking to them about kids and fund raising.

    I woke up and quickly said, “God, that’s not me. That’s my brother.”

    My brother is good with kids, so I pushed the vision out of my mind. I actually forgot about it until almost a year later. 

  • Pray for the Worldwide Church

    Rachel Chimits
    May 14, 2019

    Pummeled with constant news about crises, it becomes tempting to simply ignore the persecution of our brothers and sisters around the world.

    In a sermon at Times Square Church, Pastor Carter Conlon pointed out, “Many today find themselves journeying through this season of despair….

    “As much as you know it, you’re doing what’s right. You’re trying to be a representative of Christ in this perishing world. But it looks so hopeless! Everything seems to be going the other way, and you wonder, ‘Will I ever make a difference?’” 

    Turning off the Feelings

    Often people respond to the overwhelming number of calamities in the news by simply lowering their eyes to whatever immediately affects them and shrugging off everything else.

  • Disciples Who Make Disciples

    Andreas Steffensen
    May 13, 2019

    God makes a way for his children and gives them his favor, no matter how desperate their situation.

    In Acts chapter 3, Peter and John are entering the temple, and a lame beggar asks them for money. Peter responds, “I don’t have any silver or gold for you.”

    Pause there. This is a very strange response.

    In the chapter before, we’re told the believers had everything in common and shared money with any who had need. Surely Peter or John could’ve run down the street and asked for some money to get this poor beggar through the day.

    Instead Peter says, “I’ll give you what I have. In the name of Jesus Christ the Nazarene, get up and walk!”

    The formerly lame man goes leaping and dancing into the Temple, praising God.

  • A Question of Forgiveness

    Rachel Chimits
    May 10, 2019

    "Are there any circumstances, do you feel, where one can be a good Christian and yet not forgive?" —Queen Elizabeth II to Billy Graham, The Crown

    recent article about mental wellness advocated several appealing strategies for letting go of past hurts and creating healthier relationships: look for the positive in the situation, cultivate empathy for the other side and just move on.

    It sounds very nice, but how many people are actually able to do this?

    The real heart of the problem is that God was nowhere in this polite mix of pop-psychology and secular counciling.