Ukraine

Meditating on God’s Goodness

World Challenge Staff

Our partners in the Slavic world have expressed their gratitude for the support, prayers and gifts that make ministry possible and bless workers in the kingdom of God.

World Challenge’s partners who work in several former soviet states, MIR Ministries, tirelessly serve widows with food distribution, volunteer visitation, evangelism and pastoral care.

The Power of Relentless Love

Rachel Chimits

World Challenge’s partners are offering help and hope to widows in the war-torn villages of Ukraine.

In many parts of Ukraine, like other cultures around the world, women who have been widowed rely on family members to care for them. Sadly, that family support system is not always in place. Some widows have no family at all, and others have relatives who live too far away or are unable to take care of them.

A Desperate Cry for God

Patrick Dow

The next generation in the Ukraine is desperate for Christ’s healing and power to make a difference in their lives and their nation.

“Nicky! Nicky! Pray for me!”

We had just finished a huge crusade in Chernivtsi, western Ukraine near the Moldova and Romania borders. As the altar call ended and the crowd was being dismissed, a desperate, heavily accented voice cried out to me from the edge of the stage.

Prayer and a Light for Ukraine

Bruce Mir

While Ukrainian church leaders are building up new believers in the love and security of God, the coronavirus is shaking their nation with fear and uncertainty.

God has really been growing his church the last few years since the revolution here in Ukraine, and we’ve been privileged to come alongside many open hearts that are now experiencing God and his love for the first time.

A Prayer for Ukraine

Rachel Chimits

Gary Wilkerson and Nicky Cruz offered a conference to refresh pastors in Ukraine and over 10,000 church leaders arrived to hear them.

Chernivtsi, or Cernăuți as it is called by the Romanians, has been called “Jerusalem upon the Prut” for its strategic location between Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia.

It has traditionally been a cosmopolitan city, home to many Romanians, Germans, Russians, Poles, Hungarians, Roma and Jews.